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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the firs
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
police, swat police ended a standoff with a wanted man by using flash bang grenades. there you see windows were shattered at this home near holly park. the standoff involved the suspect accused of injuring a police officer by ramming a patrol car during a chase yesterday afternoon. police lost track of that man until someone called the police hours later. >> later that evening at about 8:30 p.m., police got a tip that the same suspect was in a residence on the 100 block of appleton. >> the standoff started about 10:45 and there you see police arrested the man. he had spent time in federal prison and has connections to gangs in san francisco. >>> san jose police were called out to a fire at a home where marijuana plants were found growing inside. the police did not issue any citations because they sate person at the home had a medical marijuana card and was growing the marijuana legally. he had about five or six plant that were found in the garage. it was a small fire. it did burn part of the garage though. firefighters were able to put it out and nobody was hurt. >> problems wit
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 p
the director of national intelligence james clapper on election night, according to a senior u.s. intelligence official. the white house says it was notified the day after the election, and the president the following day. that doesn't make sense to house homeland security chairman peter king. >> this seems to have been going on for several months yet now it appears they're saying that the fbi didn't realize until election day that general petraeus was involved. it just doesn't add up. >> "the new york times" reports the fbi actually started its investigation late this summer. the house and senate intelligence committees were also caught by surprise. >> are you going to investigate why the fbi didn't notify you before? >> yes, absolutely. i mean, this is something that could have had an effect on national security. i think we should have been told. >> the fbi was investigating harassing e-mails from petraeus' biographer. the trail led to paula broadwell, who co-wrote "all in," a biography of petraeus. broadwell described her extraordinary access to the general earlier this year on cnn. >> at s
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers had high hopes that cyber monday sales would add to what's been a strong start so far. >> if all goes as expected, today will end up being the busiest online david year, with major bargains and steep discountses just a click away. >> every year we see more and more consumers shopping is online, both the younger computer born with a computer in their crib, and the elder generation is now also shopping online. deals are become, plentiful. >> all told the research firm comstore, estimates americans will spend $1.
that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahe
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
former cia director petraeus. the current commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan, his name is john john allen, is now being investigated. he is accused of sending, or being involved with thousands of e-mails with jill kelley. she is the florida socialite who led the fbi to petraeus. steve handelsman is on capitol hill with more on this. >> thanks. good evening from capitol hill. coincidentally, general kelley is not in afghanistan tonight. he came here to washington for a hearing that was to be held tomorrow. it has been put off, day after tomorrow on, what allen still hope will be his promotion to a better job. instead, his reputation is being called into question. general john allen, u.s. commander in afghanistan, was on track to be nato commander until the disclosure that he is under investigation by the pentagon. jill kelley, a socialite in tampa and general allen allegedly exchanged e-mails and documents that were called inappropriate. allen insisted there was no affair. kelley's complaints that she was getting harassing e-mails led the fbi to paula broadwell and the affair between
in giving back to those, the veterans that dedicated to much so us. >> reporter: currently, mission solano houses 20 veterans. it is opened 24 hours a day. >>> at arlington cemetery, families can use an app to find their loved ones. there was a scandal regarding unmarked graves. since then, they photographed the graves and created a mobile phone app. >>> a second woman linked to the david petraeus scandal is asking for privacy tonight. jill kelly brought the affair to life. she claims broadwell sent her threatening e-mails warning her to stay away from petraeus. he was stunned to learn about the threatening e-mails. the sudden resignation of petraeus left congress if you wereious. they want to know -- why they were not told earlier. some senators want to know if national security was put at risk. >> the general accepted down days before he was expected to be here testifying in front of the senate intelligence committee on the benghazi at tacks. the cia is in the spotlight as they prepared to be grilled about the attack. they are now criticizing the fbi, the department of justice and the wh
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that figh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)